Frédéric Mané: Talk with French jewellery and luxury goods designer and get to know the designer



Frédéric Mané is a French jewellery and luxury goods designer and a gouache artist who has found popularity among the international brands. He believes that “Gouache paintings are the CHERRY ON THE CAKE! It’s a piece of art in its own way, but two important points need to be considered by the jewellery design. First, it is a technical map for the factory and second a gouache painting offering a huge emotion for the customer.”

Jewellery Pursuer interviewed Mané to get to know his inspiration, his journey in the jewellery field, and renowned gouache work.


Portrait of Frédéric Mané


Jewellery Pursuer: Please share your jewellery journey with us and tell us more about your jewellery designing.

Frédéric Mané: I can create a minimalist or outstanding piece, ultra-baroque, or very modern. I am a kind of chameleon, but I always have my DNA and roots lighting my inspirations. When I was 18 years old, I decided to move to Paris to study design, and I promptly understood that jewellery and objets d’arts were my destiny. I learned quickly at the Haute École de Joaillerie, where I studied jewellery painting techniques. Shortly after my studies, I was hired as a head designer for Mathon Paris and worked there for six years. It is a family atelier that works for Place Vendôme brands, as well as producing its own creations. Each morning I visit my workshop partners around Place Vendome to check my models, afterwards I visit my clients to show my drawings; I try to end my day in my design studio, surrounded by my books and painting, searching for new ideas. For the last four years, I’ve been working as an independent designer. I have my own design studio in Paris, and I collaborate with luxury groups while maintaining a deep relationship with Parisian jewellers and international signature brands. I have a strong, broad experience in design, particularly of jewellery and of precious objects and accessories. In addition, I founded the Orchestre Joaillier, a community of jewellers. More than just a forum for design, it’s a manifesto for a new generation, and I am very proud to share projects centred around common values.


JP: How did you decide to become a jewellery designer?

FM: When I was 18 years old, I decided to move to Paris to study design, and I promptly understood that jewellery and objets d’arts were my destiny. I learned quickly at the Haute École de Joaillerie, where I studied jewellery painting techniques. Shortly after my studies, I was hired as a head designer for Mathon Paris and worked there for six years. It is the family atelier that works for Place Vendôme brands, as well as producing its own creations.



Rubeus 'Eternal' transformable necklace with oval 10.30ct alexandrite, diamonds, sapphires, tanzanites and rock crystal in titanium


JP: I believe gouache paintings of jewellery are desirable artwork. What does it mean

to achieve the desired result for you?

FM: Gouache paintings are the CHERRY ON THE CAKE! It’s a piece of art in its own way, but two important points need to be considered by the jewellery design. First, it is a technical map for the factory and second a painting offering a huge emotion for the customer!

Gouache of Rubeus 'Imperial' necklace by Frédéric Mane



Jewellery gouache, Rubeus Vezuvio ring and The Peacock Eyes ring by Frédéric Mane


JP: What international exhibitions or fairs we get to see you or your amazing work?

FM: I’ve participated in plenty of big exhibitions, like Baselword Switzerland many times, Hong Kong fairs and Couture Las Vegas. I also did a lot of confidential trunk shows around the world. My favourite was in July in the Louvre and six years ago in the Emirate's Palace in Abu Dhabi. Last year, I had the opportunity to associate my signature with Rubeus Milano’s high-end jewellery collection at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs (MAD) in Paris. The Imperial necklace for this brand was the most challenging piece I had to create. It was crazy to design a piece of complete high-end jewellery collection and have it made to high standards in six months, mixing alexandrites with carved rock crystal, black titanium, gold and diamonds. Each necklace has six options for transformations. Next year I will exhibit Place Vendome with Rubeus Milano during the fashion week in Paris.



Rubeus 'Imperial' necklace with 69.37ct emerald cut alexandrite, accenting alexandrites, diamonds, spinels and rock crystal in titanium



JP: Please share with us your design style, which makes your collections unique in the jewellery market today?

FM: I like to mix those roots with new influences from the world and pop culture. It’s very important to me to listen and understand my customers, their dreams and goals. I am a sort of a  chameleon, able to convert into many influences and sometimes opposing ideas into a jewellery masterpiece.


JP: I'd like to know more about your Imperial Collection and Rock Crystal necklace with the collectors and founders of Rubeus Milano.

After a few hours of an intense and pure creative moment, I came up with my first draft. Two magnificent jewels showing like a spray of crystallinity emerging from the Earth all around, some exceptional alexandrites one of the rarest and mysterious gems are known to mankind. I decided to create a collection inspired by Mother Nature, the usual theme in jewellery is “Stones Information”, rough crystals growing, a modern artistic vision to tribute this treasure of nature, from the depths of the earth to the sky titanium and jewellery) and Eternal set (rock crystal petals and jewellery), I have been inspired by a cluster of quartz crystals lying on a deep blue plate of lapis lazuli somewhere in Moscow…

After a few hours of an intense and pure creative moment, I came up with my first draft. Two magnificent jewels showing like a spray of crystallinity emerging from the Earth all around, some exceptional alexandrites one of the rarest and mysterious gems are known to mankind. I decided to create a collection inspired by Mother Nature, the usual theme in jewellery is “Stones Information”, rough crystals growing, a modern artistic vision to tribute this treasure of nature, from the depths of the earth to the sky.



Rubeus 'Imperial' transformable necklace with oval 10.30ct alexandrite, diamonds, sapphires, tanzanites and rock crystal in titanium

JP: What's your favourite stone to date that you have worked on?

FM: Opals and alexandrites are among my favourites. I was lucky that the collectors and founders of Rubeus Milano — Nataliya and Viktor Bondarenko — has invited me to create a whole collection around the biggest and rarest alexandrites in the world. Alexandrite from Russia is the best colour-change stone, naturally moving from green in daylight to purple under incandescent light.


JP: What are the sources of inspiration for you?

FM: The basis of my inspiration is my Mediterranean roots, the world of the sea, and the light upon the Mediterranean. And of course, its ancient legends, which are so inspiring. I love raw crystals, it’s a source of inspiration! I have a fantastic partnership with a new french brand called, HOEHL‘S wellness high jewellery, an unusual concept mixing jewellery made in the rules of art with raw crystals.

JP: What is your upcoming collection?

FM: I am working on a project of unusual timepieces and rule-breaking objets d’arts for a new company — a fantastic collaborative project with my partners in crime Jothi Séroj Ebroussard and Anouck Veyret. Also, I am preparing an opulent and glamorous new collection for Rubeus Milano for 2021.


JP: What're your future plans and what's your advice be for aspiring jewellery designers?

FM: If you want to be authentic don’t be afraid to follow your maddest dreams, don’t forget your family roots, you have to work a lot in order to upgrade your skills and the most important always be connected to the rest of the world because so many cultures and people are a real source of inspiration.